Articles written by: Charles Frederick

Charles Frederick is a writer, performer, theatre artist and cultural activist (cultural animateur). He has been active in social and environmental justice, anti-war and anti-racism struggles and movements since a teenager, most often with cultural interventions and instruments. He has created mass performance forms for community political activism and mass movements. His work most often is created in the midst of political struggles, functioning as an organic intellectual in the movements for social change, seeking expressive forms of a new imaginary in history for a new egalitarian and democratic future both for the planet and its peoples, utilizing new forms of revolutionary political activism. A gay man, he worked during the AIDS crisis (a continuing world concern) both with activism and caregiving, two sides of the same struggle. (He led a decade long cultural/political action called the Cathedral Project, for which he wrote Roman Catholic Masses to be performed on the street, ending each time in civil disobedience arrests.) He has written for (and edited) movement art and cultural periodicals, such as Upfront, Cultural Democracy, Cultural Correspondence and others, publishing poetry, essays, fiction and other forms. He has often collaborated with other artists in many mediums. The Hudson River, an Autobiography is a chapter in a book he is working on entitled, Imagining Myself in History.

The Hudson River: An Autobiography
Arts & Culture / The Reading Room / Vol. 1 No. 2

The Hudson River: An Autobiography

PART IV: VISIONS IN HISTORY This town’s edge, a collapsing shore, seems always to be where live the poor. In my mother’s time, they called us river rats,/ now the words mix insults/ of race, stones on our tongues we spit at others. * * * * * History’s latest […]

The Hudson River: An Autobiography
Arts & Culture / Convergence / Politics / The Reading Room / Vol. 1 No. 1

The Hudson River: An Autobiography

PART I: Muheakantuck Much earlier, for some thousands of years, there lived here the Lenni Lenape people, “the true people,” thought to be the eldest and who were given deference among other Algonkian speaking peoples of the forest civilizations. They are the first settlers and hence the ancestors of all […]