Articles written by: Rich Blint

Rich Blint is a scholar, writer and curator. He is currently Assistant Professor of Literature in the Department of Literary Studies, Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts, The New School. He is co-editor (with Douglas Field) of a special issue of African American Review on James Baldwin (2014), and upcoming books include A Radical Interiority: James Baldwin and the Personified Self in Modern American Culture, and A Queer Spirit: Incidents in the Life of the Americas. He is also co-editor (with Courtney Thorsson) of the forthcoming Cambridge African American Literature in Transition, 1980-1990. His writing has appeared in Anthropology Now, African American Review, The James Baldwin Review, The Brooklyn Rail and sx visualities. Curatorial projects include Renee Cox: Revisiting The Queen Nanny of the Maroons Series at Columbia (2016), The Devil Finds Work: James Baldwin on Film at The Film Society of Lincoln Center (2015), and The First Sweet Music at Hanes Art Center (2014). He has received fellowships from the Andrew W. Mellon and Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship foundations.

The Present Order: A Note
Convergence / Politics / Vol. 1 No. 3-4

The Present Order: A Note

It is safe to say that we have rounded a bend. And by “we” I have in mind, simultaneously, that enduring plea and effort contained in something dubbed a nation, a country, or, not so lately now, a republic; and, a specific and newly energized segment of U.S. civilization. Ten […]

“Like Rain, Like Thunder, Like Lightning, Like Fire”
Arts & Culture / Politics / The Reading Room / Vol. 1 No. 2

“Like Rain, Like Thunder, Like Lightning, Like Fire”

By the time James Baldwin took the stage at the University of Chicago in May 1963 to speak on the subject of “The Moral (or Social) Responsibility of the Artist,” an impatient authority was immediately discernible. This recently unearthed recording of the novelist, essayist, playwright, and poet, reveals a weary […]

Down Freedom Road
Convergence / Health / Politics / Vol. 1 No. 1

Down Freedom Road

Last Thanksgiving, my mother sat in her open family room staring before and behind her as she told an animated story to me and my eldest sister. Her attention was distracted by the television she sat in front of while we stood, and the visage of Donald J. Trump that […]